Reading Week Spring ’18

It’s reading week here at Dolphin Lodge. I love to read, and so the idea of spending an entire week reading ahead in our school books excites me. We haven’t spent all our time reading, though. There are also assignments to be written, and fun to be had. They told us in the pre-arrival letters to be prepared to re-learn how to “recreate” without technology, but I wasn’t prepared for how much fun it is to spend time together without electronics (except for music, which is always a good thing to have).

Before I jump into reading week, I would like to recap the weekend. CCSP arranges it so that we don’t have assignments over the weekends, which means that a lot of us students are enjoying “real” weekends for the first time in a long time. Landon, Heather, Teri, and I kicked off our Saturday with some surfing on the point. It was Teri and I’s first time surfing, and it was so exciting to be out in the waves with the other surfers pretending we knew what we were doing. We got back from surfing just in time to head to mini golf with the whole crew! I spent a lot of vacation time growing up playing putt-putt, and so it was great to get a chance to play again. Everyone ended up doing quite well, despite a couple balls hitting the nearby shrubs. 😉

My favorite part of the weekend has to be Saturday night, when Lex, Landon, and all of the students were all hanging out in the living room. We did a variety of things, like coloring, journaling, talking, and doing a puzzle. I just can’t get over how much fun it was to relax and be creative all together. We laughed so much that night, and I went to bed full of thankfulness for the opportunity to live in community with such great people, in such a beautiful place.

I have a tendency to go into too much detail, so I won’t recount every detail about Sunday, but my favorite parts of Sunday were leading worship at the Anglican church (a hilarious experience) and reading The Fellowship of the Ring on the window seat upstairs.

On to the actual week, finally! After we had our reading week debriefing on Monday, we all went separate ways to begin reading. We went to the marae garden to work after lunch and had our first Te Reo Maori class after dinner. Tuesday, I went to poetry class with Lex, went with Landon, Jonathan, Teri, Lex and Heather to read on the beach at the point while others surfed, and then we had Te Reo again. On Wednesday, some of us had a Valentine’s Day sunrise picnic before coming back and doing more school work. Then, we celebrated Jonathan and Kat’s Birthdays with burgers, games, headstands, handmade icecream (with homemade hot fudge and candied almonds), and Pavlova! It was so much fun celebrating them and eating good food. On Thursday we spent most of our time doing school work and then had Te Reo again in the evening. Friday was spent preparing (with a brief beach break) for our Te Reo Exam and presentations in the evening.

So, you could say it’s been a good week. One full of learning about the Maori culture and language, fun times, and reading. A week of further bonding as a community and of learning how to balance school time with fun time in this beautiful location. I can honestly say that so far this experience a student with CCSP has been one of the best in my life. Here’s to more growing in our wisdom, our faith, and our friendships.


A Weekend Away

Greetings from Kaikoura, New Zealand! We’ve just gotten back from a long weekend of tramping. (That’s Kiwi for backpacking.) One group went to Lake Angelus and the other group, the one I was a part of, had planned to go to Mount Owen in Kaharungi National Park. When we got to the information center, however, they informed us that the impending weather meant that we should consider changing our plants. We also didn’t rent a four-wheeled vehicle which meant that we would have had to walk an extra eight miles that afternoon in order to get to the trailhead, so that was a no go. Instead, we decided to stay in Nelson National Park and do a tramp there. New Zealand has this awesome network of tramping huts all over the country that only cost $5-$15 a night and they’re right on the trail, so it makes it a bit more accessible to people and certainly made things a bit easier for us. We bought some hut passes, took a picture of the map on the wall because we didn’t want to buy a paper map, and headed on our way. Overall, the trails were gorgeous. We walked through forests covered in ferns, mosses, and mushrooms in many colors. Here’s a picture of what some of the trail looked like:


The change of plans turned out to be a blessing in disguise, however. On our way to our second hut, we met a couple from France who said that they had just stayed at that hut and that there was an amazing waterfall only an hour’s hike from the hut. Once we got to the hut, we warmed up by the fireplace, dried our socks, and decided to go find that waterfall. Despite being pretty tired from a long day’s hike, the thought of a pretty cool waterfall pushed us forward and once we got there, we were certainly glad that we had. Not only was there a waterfall tumbling down and weaving its way between rocks, surround by lush greenery, but directly opposite was the biggest, most impressive valley I had ever seen. We were all speechless. Standing in between that waterfall and the mountains towering ahead of me, I felt small. There aren’t adequate words in the English language to try and describe the experience of being there, but in an effort to, I will say that it was a manifestation of the grandeur of God, played out in His creation. It reminded me just how small I am and just how grand and majestic my God is. It is the kind of experience you impress upon every corner of your brain, hoping it will never leave you. Following are a couple of pictures I took in an attempt to capture this beauty:





Besides the amazing views, the trip proved to be a fun time between friends, both new and old. There were six of us, each with a very important role that was essential to the group. Those six roles were as follows:

  • Honorable Toilet Paper Carrier
  • Master Chef
  • Just and Fair Pathfinder
  • Spunky Conversation Instigator
  • Human Garbage Can
  • Bug Attractant

As you can see, we had all the necessary components of a functioning team and it was a pretty great trip. So, if you ever get the chance to go on a tramping trip in New Zealand with people you just met a week ago, I say do it.


–  post written by Ellie Jasper, CCSP student from Dordt College

Till Next Time

Snow catching the first rays of sunrise

The month of May has flown by and winter has claimed New Zealand. A few weeks ago we said a tearful goodbye to the students and sent them off with loads of awesome memories. Though it’s sad to let them go it’s exciting to know they’re equipped to change their corners of the world and continue God’s work of shalom.

The Dolphin Lodge is now eerily quiet (though I’m sure the neighbors are enjoying it). The town of Kaikoura is settling in for a busy winter; it is hosting 300 workers who will repair the roads and open up access to the north again. They are housed in a temporary village and while it might mean less rest for locals it will also mean more business for those in food service who will be providing meals for the workers. On the workers’ end, Kaikoura is not too shabby of a place to be stuck for a few months!

Four of us staff have also finished our time with CCSP. Those staying will be joined by a new Program Administrator and two SLCs in August. Soon enough they’ll be welcoming a new crew of students to make more fun memories at Dolphin Lodge!  

As for me, well, I’ll be passing the administration of this blog on to the next staff member. I have no plans to return to New Zealand… yet. Somehow I think I’ll always find a way back. So rather than say goodbye, I’ll say “till we meet again.” It’s been a fantastic semester and I hope you’ve enjoyed getting a glimpse into it.

This is Essie signing off.


The Kaikoura ranges from the air

Despite the Earthquake, God is Here

On November 14th, 2016, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Kaikoura. Given the strength of the earthquake it was a miracle that only two people lost their lives. A holiday weekend with lots of tourists visiting here had just ended, and most people were at home instead of the hotels or other common areas that were among the most damaged. Nevertheless there was a lot of damage: particularly in the commercial district that was gearing up for what would usually be a peak tourist season. But the road northward was blocked, and few tourists came.

This was the setting that my cohort of CCSP entered. I, for one, was largely naïve of the impact of the earthquake. Our program was relocated, but it was to a beautiful spot overlooking the ocean and close to town. I had nothing to compare it to, and thus no sense of the loss that occurred. The loss first began to hit me when I biked out to see the old convent with Kelly, one of my friends from the program. As we carefully walked around the outside of the building, I saw what a beautiful place it was. It was large with balconies and porches, and surrounded by flowers and fields. Sanctuary seems like the only word to describe it: it was a place set aside for the work of God, a place of peace, healing, and contemplation. Even in its brokenness it was beautiful; there were still vegetables growing in the garden and at a distance through the windows we could see artwork on the walls and a bowl of fruit sitting in the living room. But now there was glass on the ground and caution tape surrounding the parameter. Like the pictures you see on TV, I saw a perfect place frozen in time by a natural disaster. I started to understand the deep impact of this event on those around me, and saw how deep the hurt ran.

I see God in the eyes of the Christians of Kaikoura. Their eyes sparkle and glow as they talk about the work of God in this town and in their lives. They talk about how fear tried to enter their lives with the earthquake, but how they know that God did not give us a spirit of fear but of power. Therefore, they refuse to let fear enter their lives.

This past break I had the opportunity to stay local for a part of it and get to know the people here. One woman, Fiona, learned that we were staying out of town and welcomed us to stay at her home since it was closer to church and town. I’ve seen a lot of homes and businesses that are still in disarray, but her home was filled with peace. For a while she didn’t put back up the fragile decorations hanging on the wall in case an aftershock knocked them off again. But she decided that she wanted her home to be a place of healing and of peace, so she decided to hang up her decorations anyways. Her warm welcome to us and the peace of her home was such a blessing. As she talked her eyes glowed about God’s provision during the earthquake, the Holy Spirit’s work in her family, and how God has brought her beautiful, full household together. There is life here, and new beginnings despite the pain.

You know that feeling of excitement you get when someone’s eyes light up when they talk about their passions? I’ve never met a group of people so alive that they bring Jesus into every conversation, and found so many people with sparkling eyes. So if you ask me where I see God here: He’s so clearly living in people who see hope amid chaos, and the Sprit working within pain. I see a people who are passionate about how God has redeemed their lives and their pasts, and who desire for others to find the same joy that they have discovered. It’s contagious really, and so far beyond what would be expected given the circumstances. This contagious joy and peace might just be the most beautiful thing I have experienced in New Zealand so far.


Me with Lisa, one of my favorite faith-filled Kiwis! This post is dedicated to Lisa, Fiona, and Dawn. 



Life at Dolphin Lodge

Those of us at CCSP this semester are the first group of students to call Dolphin Lodge home. We have the privilege of being the group who can first form traditions here, and notice the quirks that make it special to live here. Living in a house with eighteen other people can take some time to adjust to. But now that I’ve been here for a month, I can say without hesitation that the positives outweigh the negatives. Life at Dolphin Lodge is very centered on shared work and shared fun. A tour through the house and property will give a glimpse into all the different aspects of life that we share with each other. Beginning outside in our backyard where there’s a lemon tree, an apricot tree, and a Pohutukawa tree (also known as a New Zealand Christmas tree). There are wash basins where we do our laundry by hand. A laundry line where we hang our clothes out to dry and hope that wind doesn’t blow our underwear away or rain fall and soak everything all over again (both have happened). Outside is our back deck where we eat meals gathered around picnic tables. Doors lead into the kitchen where we take turns washing dishes after meals. In the kitchen there’s lots of things to share besides responsibilities. There’s always someone to split a pot of French press coffee with. There’s always someone to talk to about whatever might be tumbling around in your mind after a thought provoking class session. Sometimes we use the kitchen to make late night desserts without recipes, throwing ingredients into the bowl and having it still turn out delicious in the end. Upstairs we have our classroom space, which we also use as a common area to sit on sofas and read. There’s a little cozy library filled with books about New Zealand history, Maori culture, gardening, ecology, community development, or whatever other fascinating subject you want to dig into. Also upstairs is a deck that looks out over the ocean. If you pay close attention, you can spot a pod of dolphins from up there. The beach is a three-minute walk down the hill and across the road, so spontaneous swimming is almost a daily occurrence at the Dolphin Lodge. We swim out to a rock that we can climb on and sunbathe and jump off of. Dolphin Lodge is often full of laughter, good food, good friends, and learning. We learn in classes, but we are also learning much from simply living with each other. We’ve been learning how to live well with each other and how to manage conflicts. We’ve learned the abundant joy that occurs when you share life with others.

~ Emma Buchanan



It’s a golden early September. The cool grey clouds still glaze over our heads, but the sun has been pressing closer day by day. Sunlight flickers off of the sea, just for pinpoints in time. Sara is already snug in her cockpit, her neoprene skirt stretched tight around the kayak seat’s protruding upper lip. I lean forward, knees bent, and push the hefty tandem boat from the stern into the softly crashing waves. My neoprene booties seem impenetrable only for a second. The chilled seawater finds its way through the opening at my ankles and seep around my toes. I jump into my cockpit. Stretch the skirt over the lip. Flatten the lever and lower my rudder. Finally, I pick the paddle up by its shaft and push the blade against sand and frothing surf.

We are like an unobtrusive intruder in this polyethylene, tiny red ship, both shooting through the water and bobbing like a top in this sheltered bay. The sea rolls underneath. I can imagine I’m riding atop a massive blue-backed leviathan. Its diaphragm rising and falling.


Gull cries pierce the soft symphony of wind and waves. They peel off towards the Abel Tasman coast, hills cloaked in green and the dissolving morning haze. I watch them glide in circles, beat their wings, and swing back around. Gwen sits in his single-seat kayak, perks of being a guide. He detracts me from my gaze and tells us that Adele Island is our next stop. Straight ahead, it sits indifferently to our tiny presence, as small as it is itself.


As we paddle closer, my shoulder burns. Gwen tells me to swing more, but I reckon to myself it’s because I have to contend to the waves pushing back. My suspicions are confirmed when we near the sheltered Adele coast. The water calms, but still shatters and foams against the coarse, beaten granite boulders. I navigate the shoreline with forced confidence, emulating Gwen who slips unflinchingly between sharp protruding pillars. Suddenly I realize that the rocks, which once appeared empty, were dotted with New Zealand fur seals. Properly, as Gwen explained, sea lions. Many slumber on, either unaware or indifferent to our minute, quiet presence. However, as we press on, a small dark shape flounces ungainly, enthusiastically off a granite shear into the water. Suddenly transformed into a graceful smooth-spinner, it flows and cuts through the water at the same time towards Gwen’s kayak.

Like a little black Labrador pup, the young seal follows closely at Gwen’s heals. He flicks his tail, nose dives, twists, as though dancing with the kayak’s rudder. Eventually Gwen slides away, and I find myself gingerly pressing my foot against the left pedal towards the shore. Sara is quiet, but I sense her excitement vibrating into the air as much as mine. The seal pup is relatively still now, treading, with its head peering above the shallow, bright turquoise water. I can only identify its feeling as curiosity. Then, it decides. Our kayak teeters lightly above small ripples, waiting. Breath. Held. In.

Kekeno. It is the name the Maori people give the New Zealand fur seal. Gwen told us the name means “large eyes”. Rightly so. Between his jovial swim-dance, he would stop to watch us. Watching us watch him. Gwen watches us watch each other. He has the biggest brown black eyes, the white yellow sun glinting off his wide, curious orbs. His fur is slick, brown black too. A pup’s fur is usually darker. The sunlight defines the smoothed, thick hairs which groove together, linear crevasses and ridgelines, basin and range topography.

The pup dives into the water from its outpost. He twists, spins, flows like a swift river’s current. Straight to us he glides. I think I let out a small squeak – the balloon in my chest was so filled with excitement, I couldn’t help let a small bit escape. I twist my torso, limited to the skirt hugging my waist, to see the pup prance at our stern. He could best an Olympic synchronized swimmer. My fibers wish to transform into this furry, joyful body. Slide ungainly from polyethylene into salty, living, seawater. And be free.



A Different Sort of Life

Hi! I’m Sara Warmuth. I am a junior Business Administration major at Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts. I grew up in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, and now call Kauai, Hawaii home. I love being here in New Zealand. Kaikoura is a wonderful place, one where you can swim with snowcapped mountains in view.

Our wonderful blog-running fairy, Essie, asked me if I could write a post about what is different here at CCSP in comparison to home. The first thing I noticed in Kaikoura was how similar it was to other places I had been. On the drive from Christchurch to Kaikoura, the homes reminded me of Hawaii, and the cutting and burning happening on the drive felt familiar, and sad. The forests were unique in some ways, but still felt fairly similar to the forests in Hawaii. Even the people were sarcastic, and had a similar humor to that of the Massachusetts area I have come to know and love. As I grow more accustomed to being here at The Old Convent, living in community, I begin to notice little things that are different. First, The Old Convent is a place where people drop in. So many locals have connections with it, so they come randomly throughout the day, and sometimes stay for a meal. This is a great way to get to know the locals and the culture of the area, but it can also be frustrating when I am in the middle of homework and then suddenly have a visitor show up. However, the main differences about living here have nothing to do with the Kiwi (New Zealander) culture or the land we live on. Our community of North Americans (the two Canadians make it so I can’t just say Americans) is an eclectic group that often dances through doing the dishes, the laundry, the weeding, and through life. Whether it is Amy sending “real life snapchats”, which is really just her making weird faces towards someone, or Joey saying “Sara help me” whenever the slightest thing happens, we always interact in ways unique to us and to our experience here. This can also lead to some frustration, as we are always together. Victoria last night, when unable to find a staff member, exclaimed, “I didn’t want to tell any of you my problem because it has to do with my secret homework spot!” A part of her needed to protect that one space of privacy, and I respect that. Yet part of me is going to miss the feeling of being cramped when I go back. We are so close here, physically and emotionally, because we don’t have the opportunities to be apart. That creates a community unlike one I have ever been a part of before. And it is still only half way through the semester! Here’s to a second half of loving nature, loving God, and loving each other here in beautiful Kaikoura.